Welcome to Guide Prescribed, Issue 001, the newest edition to sipping sun. Today’s recommendations come with deep appreciation, love, and smitten-hood. These simple treasures have recently walked into my life, and, with great hospitality on my part, will be staying for awhile. Not everything lasts forever, especially a fresh and fragrant bouquet of flowers, which is why I choose to share these gifts with you so that you might prolong their expectancy in your own way.

It it with immense joy in our journey together that I present to you a few of my favorite things lately. Below, you will find a perfume that I’ve fallen in love with, a magazine we all deserve to read and have on our shelves, and lastly a not-quite-seasonal flower that can accompany just you or bring along with it a few more of its kind. Far more than just a recommendation, I absolutely insist you follow up on each lead in today’s post. After all, it is guide prescribed // a golden delight to suit your exceptional life.

Gucci

It was December and my husband took me out for our anniversary, before our dinner reservation, to give my nose a try at a few jasmine and peony perfumes that he so relentlessly researched. Both scents of which I love, and have been searching for the perfect replacement for my limited edition jasmine & neroli perfume from L’Occitan. It had been well before the heat of summer ’17 that I begged every last drop of floral-citrus to exit its safe glass entrapment.

Long story short, I wasn’t in the mood to pick out a perfume that day, and arrogantly I insisted that I’d smelled every single one but was still unable to find one that was well suited for me. The truth is, I was waiting until I could order a perfume from Jo Malone, Peony Blush Suede. It was the next best fragrance that I loved so much after my jasmine & neroli, a whole new combination of soft feminine floral.

This passed week, with a little time on my hands and a desire to get out of the house, I found myself gravitated towards the perfume counter again. Immediately I walked over to Chanel to rule out what has both worked and not worked for me in the past. Gabrielle certainly wasn’t the sort of feminine fragrance I was going for, and so after being pointed in the direction of the Gucci fragrances, it was as if I walked through a secret garden door designed especially for me. After the first spritz, I was in near disbelief that the perfume I was perhaps hoping for did indeed exist after all, and I have Alessandro Michele to thank for that.

Creative director Alessandro Michele designed a fragrance for women, “a scent designed to celebrate the authenticity, vitality and diversity of women—flourishing in a natural, expressive and individual way.” Gucci Bloom is a hypnotizing composition of tuberose (a note I am just now learning about), jasmine (a favorite as you now know), and Rangoon Creeper, similar to Chinese honeysuckle (“a unique flower discovered in South India that…transports the wearer to an imaginary garden.”).

I realize that many women don’t like the smell of tuberose on their skin, which is definitely going to be the case with any perfume. The wonderful thing about finding a signature scent is that it’s all about you. In this case, it’s all about me, and I love Gucci Bloom. Finding another jasmine perfume was essential, as I know that jasmine smells really good on my skin. At first sniff, it was as if I walked by a flower bush abundant with blooms. I not only was immersed in the scent of the flowers, but I got some of that greenery and earthiness too, like something freshly planted.

If you’ve been looking for a feminine jasmine perfume, with a hint of gardenia and shower fresh powdery goodness, then Bloom may be good for you too. With my purchase, I also received a Gucci Bloom journal (I know, sounds silly, but it’s so beautiful!). The red floral pattern is super vintage, the paper inside is really smooth, and the bottle with its black & white label also has a retro vibe that I’m super into. Unfortunately, the perfume doesn’t come with a Gucci dress or embroidered bomber jacket like in the advertisement. I told the woman at the counter that if I buy this perfume, I’d have to buy the jacket in the picture too. She laughed.

I was being serious.

for the perfume go here

Kinfolk

Kinfolk! Kinfolk! Read all about it!

I don’t just love Kinfolk, I absolutely enjoy it. From the short articles, to the lengthy features, from the uncoated pages and unassuming advertisements to the crossword puzzle, at the back of every issue, that I actually know the answers to without a bunch of help. Reading this quarterly magazine is such a reward. I even start with the crossword puzzle sometimes just so I get that flood of dopamine from the “get-go” (as my mom would put it).

What’s intrigued me in Issue 26, and also what I would encourage you to look at too when you pick up a copy for yourself, are the stories on Daniela Soto-Innes, Paloma Lanna, and an essay that originally appeared in a 2014 issue of The New Yorker by David Sedaris.

Daniela keeps it simple in her Mexican restaurant in New York City by serving food on white plates; she keeps it simple in her daily life by wearing all black every day. I love this idea of removing all the decisions, letting the work shine, letting ourselves shine, and keeping the headaches to a minimum. Another part of interview that I enjoyed was her definition of childhood: pure happiness with no baggage. “When you’re a child, you don’t think of the problems or negativity around you. You don’t even think that things are necessarily positive. You just keep asking why and exploring. You’re constantly amazed. If we could just stay that way, staying conscious of what’s around, everyone would be so much happier,” she says.

Her words are so beautiful, just as her story is, and her self-awareness at twenty-seven is impactful as well. I loved learning even just a little bit about Daniela through this highlight.

Onto the second girl crush of the day – Paloma Lanna is driving a fashion project that we are all desperate for. Her desire to produce something related to the slow fashion movement we are recognizing, is what brings just the right amount of attention to her work. Here is an excerpt from the article: “Her clothing line resists the rules of fashion: no seasonal collections, no mass production, no slashed prices during sales season. Instead, she crafts limited-edition capsule collections made locally from European fabrics. When an item sells out, that’s it,” writes Pip Usher. “I prefer to produce in a more sustainable way,” says Paloma.

On the subject of childhood, as it relates to the first interview, it is evident in her line of clothing in which the designs are relaxed and her exploratory approach to different projects is childlike in its curiosity. Paloma talks about her friends being close collaborators and instrumental to the work she produces, and remembers when most of them were little and knew each other even then. “We were always playing and exploring and doing experiments. If we made mistakes, it was always okay and we’d laugh about them,” she says.  What an incredible reminder to just enjoy seeing the outcome. This is certainly advice that we can take into our whole lives, and apply in every instance.

We definitely can use more play in our adult lives. This play will allow for compassion and love to rule the day.

As for David Sedaris, well, you’ll really just have to read what he has to say about his early days of wearing a Fit-bit. Let me just say that you will likely enjoy the parts about the cow and her calf, his competitive edge to get in more steps every day, and the reward from the local council for being a trash picker-upper.

Enjoy!

for the magazine | go here

Guide Prescribed | 001

Hydrangea

While hydrangeas are available much of the year, I’ve gathered that they aren’t typically considered to be a winter flower, but rather one to look for in the spring and summer, even through fall. When our grocery store displays hydrangeas, we are likely to pick up a few in odd numbers. Last week, my husband actually surprised me with three blue & white full bloom hydrangeas – my favorite as he knows.

It had been months since we had flowers on our table, so the gesture was a little bit overdue, but welcomed all the same. What I love about hydrangeas, beside how gorgeous they are, is that they really do last a long time when simply cared for. When you buy hydrangeas, their stems are very long. Unless you have an extremely tall vase, which I wouldn’t recommend, then you will have to cut them. I’ve been advised to cut them at a steep diagonal, in-between knobs on the stem, with a knife rather than a pair of gardening sheers. I’ve used both with success. The issue is that sometimes when trimming the stems the bottom actually closes and these thirsty flowers aren’t able to drink to their heart’s content.

Personally, I trim them every couple of days, or more often if some of them seem to get droopy and shriveled. The magical thing about hydrangeas is just as when they look like they’re about to die, all you have to do is change their water, add new food (1/2 – 1 full packet of flower food), and watch them come back to life. It all happens nearly before your eyes! While I was cleaning our apartment the other day, I gave my little guys a refresh and within just a couple of hours they were like new again. It’s incredible and wildly irresistible.

And for someone who knows very little about plants and flowers, I can guarantee these babies will both make you happy and deliver you a little pride in the green-thumb department. Go ahead, buy yourself a few, and let them do their magic.

Tip: place a single flower in a thin-necked vase at your bedside or on a small table in a favorite room of the house; buy in groups of 3 or 5 – the odd numbers seem to play nicely together; place your grouping of them in a vase in a room that could use more love and shine – they are much less expensive than a plethora of wall art, so if you’re suffering from being a newbie like we are, then buy yourself some flowers and rest easy about it.

for the flowers | see your local farmer’s market or grocery store

Guide Prescribed | 001

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